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Have your say on the community remedy

23 September, 2014

HOW do you think those responsible for anti-social behaviour and low-level crime in your neighbourhood should be dealt with?

Would you like to see them apologise to their victims, or maybe you think they should repair the damage they’ve caused, or speak to the victim about the impact their behaviour has had on them?

As part of the new Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 victims are being given a say in how offenders are dealt with through the Community Remedy – and Police and Crime Commissioner Clive Grunshaw is in charge of how that looks for Lancashire.

And the Commissioner wants your input into what measures you think should be included on that list, before he agrees the final Community Remedy document with the county’s Chief Constable.

Mr Grunshaw said: “Community Remedy will be used in cases where dealing with offenders out of court is the most appropriate option, and it will be an important way of giving victims a voice in this process.

“As Police and Crime Commissioner I want to empower victims and communities. I want them to feel involved in tackling the issues which blight their neighbourhoods and to feel satisfied with the outcome if they have been a victim of crime.

“By having a say on what should be included in Lancashire’s Community Remedy document, residents can influence how offenders are dealt with. The measures need to be appropriate and proportionate to the types of offences – and they also need to be things which will have a positive impact.

“Ultimately the aim is to empower victims, rehabilitate offenders, and see damage repaired.”

In order for a Community Remedy to be used the offender needs to accept they’ve committed an offence, the victim needs to agree with them on the remedy and the police need to agree the remedy is appropriate for both the crime and the offender.

Suggested remedies include the offender meeting the victim face-to-face through a Restorative Justice process, an apology from the offender to the victim either by letter or face-to-face or the offender repairing the damage or cleaning up any mess caused as a result of their actions.

In total, the Commissioner is asking residents to indicate whether they agree or disagree with seven proposed options, and is also asking for them to make any suggestions.

Have your say here.

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